Request a Free Estimate
Call or Text
(662) 397-2201

Everything You Need to Know About Crepe Myrtles

crepe myrtle dealer near me
February 17th, 2018   Category: Plant Information -

Many people in the south love planting crepe myrtles in their yards. There are around 50 different species of the crepe myrtle, some of which are deciduous trees and some of which are shrubs.

Many of these varieties produce gorgeous flowers in the spring and also look great in the fall. They can be an attractive addition to any garden because they provide color all year long. They grow best in areas that have long, cool falls. If they’re hit by a sudden frost after a period of warm weather, the leaves are likely to freeze and fall off.

Most people will plant crepe myrtles that come from the L. indica species or that are hybrids between the L. indica and the L. fauriei species. This is because the L. fauriei crepe myrtles are quite hardy and have very nice bark that many people love. For those in the Tropical South, the Queen’s crepe myrtle, also called the L. speciosa, is a nice option. However, it doesn’t thrive outside of this climate.

Basic Information About Crepe Myrtles

  • Classification: Lythraceae
  • Scientific Name: Lagerstroemia
  • Type: Deciduous trees and shrubs
  • Sunlight needed: full sun
  • Water needed: moderate amount
  • Climates: US, MS, LS, CS H10-6 (with some exceptions)

Crepe Myrtle Care

Caring for a crepe myrtle is fairly easy, although they do require a good amount of pruning. New wood will bloom every year, so you need to make sure you’ve pruned them before that time. Generally, you’ll prune your crepe myrtle during the winter or the early spring. For shrubs and large trees, you’ll want to cut back any crossing branches, twiggy growths, and basal suckers. You’ll also want to remove any of the branches that are growing into the center of the crepe myrtle.

Any side branches that are more than four or five feet long, should also be removed. This will prevent them from breaking in high winds and bad weather, plus it will leave the gorgeous bark of the crepe myrtle’s trunk exposed.

While your crepe myrtles are blooming, you’ll want to remove any spent flowers. This will help encourage the plants to bloom a second time. You may also need to remove some of the twiggy growth throughout the spring and summer, especially if you have a dwarf crepe myrtle.

Don’t Go Too Far

“Crepe murder” is the term for pruning a crepe myrtle down to the point that it’s nothing but a little stub. If you do this during the spring, you’ll be damaging the natural look of these trees and shrubs. Doing this also encourages crepe myrtle to grow more spindly branches that are just not as attractive. These whip-like branches also usually can’t support the weight of the blooms, making the plant look quite sad during the summer.

What can you do if you find your crepe myrtle has grown too tall? During the late winter, cut no more than two or three feet off of the upper branches. Make sure you always cut the branches back to a bud or side branch. The best tool to use in this case is a pair of hand pruners. If you need to cut a branch that’s more than two inches thick, cut it to the trunk or split. Never leave behind any big stubs. These not only look ugly, they make it harder for the crepe myrtle to grow back like it should.

Crepe Myrtle Varieties

Crepe Myrtles come in a variety of sizes, colors, and types. The area you are considering will depend on which variety you choose.

Crepe Myrtle Trees – over 30-feet in height

Muskogee is a broad upright crepe myrtle with light lavender flowers, a light gray-brown colored trunk, and averages 35 feet in height.

Natchez is a broad upright crepe myrtle with white flowers, a cinnamon colored trunk and averages 35 feet in height.

Fantasy is a broad upright crepe myrtle with white flowers, a cinnamon colored trunk and averages 35 feet in height.

Fauriei species is a broad upright crepe myrtle with white flowers, a cinnamon colored trunk and averages 35 – 50 feet in height.

Crepe Myrtle Varieties – 26 – 30-feet in height

Chocktaw is a globose (sphere or ball shape) crepe myrtle with clear pink flowers, a light cinnamon colored trunk and averages 27 feet in height.

Biloxi is a vase crepe myrtle with pale pink flowers, a dark brown colored trunk, and averages 27 feet in height.

Crepe Myrtle Varieties – over 21 – 25 feet in height

Tuscarora is a broad vase crepe myrtle with dark coral pink flowers, a light brown colored trunk, and averages 23 feet in height.

Miami is an upright crepe myrtle with dark pink flowers, a dark brown colored trunk, and averages 25 feet in height.

Wichita is a vase crepe myrtle with light magenta flowers, a dark brown colored trunk, and averages 25 feet in height.

Crepe Myrtle Varieties – over 16 – 20 feet in height

Seminole is a globose (sphere or ball shape) crepe myrtle with medium pink flowers, a silvery-gray colored trunk, and averages 17 feet in height.

Tuskegee is a spreading crepe myrtle with dark rose flowers, a light gray-tan colored trunk and averages 17 feet in height.

Potomac is an arching crepe myrtle with clear medium pink flowers, a silvery gray colored trunk, and averages 18 feet in height.

Catawba is a spreading crepe myrtle with dark purple flowers, a silvery gray colored trunk, and averages 19 feet in height.

Conestoga is an arching crepe myrtle with lavender bicolor flowers, a silvery gray colored trunk, and averages 19 feet in height.

Apalachee is an upright crepe myrtle with light lavender flowers, a medium brown colored trunk, and averages 19 feet in height.

Townhouse is a spreading crepe myrtle with white flowers, a dark cinnamon colored trunk and averages 20 feet in height.

Powhatan is an upright crepe myrtle with light lavender flowers, a silvery gray colored trunk, and averages 20 feet in height.

Crepe Myrtle Varieties – over 11 – 15 feet in height

Acoma is a spreading crepe myrtle with white flowers, a light gray-brown colored trunk, and averages 15 feet in height.

Comanchee is an upright crepe myrtle with dark coral pink flowers, a light sandalwood colored trunk and averages 15 feet in height.

Lipan is an upright crepe myrtle with medium lavender flowers, a near white colored trunk and averages 15 feet in height.

Osage is a pendulous (dangling) crepe myrtle with clear pink flowers, a dark brown colored trunk, and averages 15 feet in height.

Sioux is an upright crepe myrtle with intense dark pink flowers, a medium gray-brown colored trunk, and averages 15 feet in height.

Yuma is an upright crepe myrtle with lavender bicolor flowers, a silvery gray colored trunk, and averages 15 feet in height.

Crepe Myrtle Varieties – 10 feet or less in height

Chickasaw is a crepe myrtle shrub has pink flowers and averages 3 feet in height

Centennial is a crepe myrtle shrub, has purple flowers and averages 4 feet in height.

Victor is a crepe myrtle shrub, has deep red flowers and averages 5 feet in height.

Caddo is a spreading crepe myrtle with pink flowers, a cinnamon colored trunk and averages 7 feet in height.

Hopi is a spreading crepe myrtle with light-pink flowers, a gray-brown trunk, and averages 9 feet in height.

Pecos is a spreading crepe myrtle with clear medium pink flowers, a dark brown trunk, and averages 9 feet in height.

Zuni is a spreading crepe myrtle with medium-lavender flowers, a light brown-gray trunk, and averages 9 feet in height.

Tonto is a globose (sphere or ball shape) crepe myrtle with dark fuchsia flowers, a light cream trunk and averages 9 feet in height.

Cherokee is a globose (sphere or ball shape) crepe myrtle with bright red flowers, a silvery gray trunk, and averages 10 feet in height.


We are here to help if you have questions about which crepe myrtles would be best for your outdoor space. Give us a call or contact us.

Tags:

We what we do!

Let us help design, install, and maintain your outdoor living spaces.